Not All Fonts are Created Equal

By Stephanie Sprouse

When developing brand standards, sometimes font choice becomes an afterthought. It doesn’t matter that much anyway, right? As long as it looks interesting and people can read it?

Wrong.

There are many things to consider when choosing the font for your logo, and those that you’ll use for your stationery, print ads, etc., so I’ll break it down to a couple of simple do’s and don’ts.

DO think outside the box. While the classic fonts like Adobe Garamond Pro are excellent, they are used often simply because they work, not because they’re creative.

DON’T go wild. I know I just said to branch out from the standard fonts, but don’t pick a font just because it’s unique – it has to work, too.

DON’T use the following fonts:

• Comic Sans

• Copperplate

• Curls Mt

• Herculanum

• Papyrus

These are just a few examples of fonts that are overused by certain industries or too “cute” to be taken seriously. You have to find a font that fits your brand personality and presents professionally.

DO mix it up. You don’t need to use the same font in your marketing materials that you use in your logo. Fonts can compliment each other well, and as long as you don’t use too many, they can help make key parts of your message stand out.

DON’T over do it. Limit your font choices in a single piece to one serif (Times New Roman, Adobe Garamond Pro, etc.), one sans-serif (Arial, Helvetica, etc.), and one decorative font (if necessary). Too many fonts can create confusion and distract the eye from the point of your message.

These are just a few things to consider when selecting a font. Notice that I didn’t recommend any fonts TO use. That’s because no one font works for every brand. Whether you opt for something unique or a classic, make sure to take the time to choose the best fonts for your brand.

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